A Privilege to Learn and Serve

By: Maria Salciccioli, Senior Policy Analyst

 

Friday, July 13th was my last day at SBOE, and I’ve been reflecting on a wonderful year and a half. Although I’d lived in DC for six years before I started at SBOE, having worked as a teacher, researcher, and political appointee at the US Department of Education, I didn’t know much about education in the city I lived in, including exactly how SBOE, OSSE, the DME, DCPS, and PCSB worked together to educate the roughly 100,000 students who attend public schools in DC. Since joining the agency, however, I’ve had the privilege to both learn and serve.

As Senior Policy Analyst at SBOE, I worked as project manager for our two task forces – High School Graduation Requirements and ESSA. The graduation task force convened stakeholders from across the city, held in-depth discussions on what we want District graduates to know and be able to do, and created recommendations that are designed to improve student preparation and ensure that a District diploma is meaningful and is conferred to graduates who are well-prepared for college and career. The process was eye-opening – bringing together stakeholders from across the city means that it’s incredibly difficult to come to consensus on the best way to support children, but it is critical to have a variety of voices at the table, and I think the recommendations were stronger because of the diverse input that went into them. The ESSA task force is partnering with OSSE to ensure the ESSA plan is implemented with families in mind, and the outreach OSSE and task force members have engaged in is unprecedented across the country. Even though it has been a groundbreaking effort, there is still hard work to do with family engagement, and I am excited to see where the Board takes its practices over the years to come.

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State Board in the Community: June 2018

By: Paul Negron, Public Affairs Specialist

In June, SBOE members criss-crossed the District visiting DC public schools and public charter schools, attending high school graduation events, and participating in important community gatherings.

Karen (Ward 7 / President), Ashley (At-Large), and Joe (Ward 6) attended Mayor Bowser’s press conference announcing the new search committee for DC Public Schools Chancellor


Karen (Ward 7 / President)
was the keynote speaker at Total Sunshine’s annual school grade awards ceremony honoring D.C.’s public and charter high school valedictorians and salutatorians

Jack (Ward 2 / Vice President) honored award recipients at the Critics and Awards Program for High School Students Awards (Cappies) ceremony

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Supporting Students’ Social, Emotional, and Academic Development

By: Maria Salciccioli, Senior Policy Analyst

Earlier this month, I attended the Aspen Institute’s event: The Practice Base for How We Learn: Supporting Students’ Social, Emotional, and Academic Development. The event was cohosted with the National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development. I was interested to learn what they’d be saying, in part because the State Board of Education’s ESSA Task Force is examining all aspects of how to provide a well-rounded education, and focusing on students’ emotional as well as academic development is increasingly gaining respect as a key strategy.

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Make Your Voice Heard on the ESSA School Report Card

By: Paul Negron, Public Affairs Specialist

The DC State Board of Education (SBOE) will hold its monthly public meeting on Wednesday, January 17, 2018, at 5:30 p.m. in the Old Council Chambers at 441 4th Street NW. The SBOE wants to hear the community’s thoughts on the proposed content of a new school report card that will provide the same information about every public and public charter school in the District. The school report card will contain two kinds of data: information that is required by the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and information that is important to the residents of the District. The public may sign up online to testify at this month’s SBOE Public meeting about the school report card. The deadline to sign up is 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, January 16, 2017. Residents who testify will have three minutes to provide their input and recommendations to the SBOE.

At Tuesday night’s SBOE ESSA Task Force meeting, representatives from the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) outlined updates to their content and format proposal for the new report card. Task force members reviewed the proposal and provided comments and recommendations. This proposal was based on feedback from State Board members, community members, and the members of the ESSA Task Force. Over the next few weeks, OSSE will work with the SBOE to finalize the content proposal with the intention that the State Board will vote on the proposal at its February public meeting.

#ESSATaskForce Hears #DCReportCard Parent Feedback

By Paul Negron, Public Affairs Specialist 

The SBOE Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Task Force met on Tuesday, December 5, 2017 to discuss the new version of DC’s school report card. Maya Martin, Executive Director of Parents Amplifying Voices in Education (PAVE), Josh Boots, Executive Director of EmpowerK12, and representatives from the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) provided task force members with an overview of recently held parent feedback sessions on the DC school report card.

PAVE held meetings with each of its Parent Leaders in Education (PLE) Boards in Wards 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. Parents were asked to rank the top five things they looked for when they chose a school for their student. Parents then examined PCSB’s Performance Management Framework Reports, DC Public School’s Scorecards, and the LEARN DC profiles, and discussed the pros and cons of each. In addition, PAVE canvassed and collected surveys from 51 total parents. 85% of parents who attended sessions said “Student Performance by Subgroup” and “Teacher Quality” were the most important factors needed on a DC school report card. Re-enrollment, School Funding, and Attendance were also rated highly. Parents want one source where they can get data, and one that helps them interpret quality more easily.

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